Indiana Academic Standards Support


We asked our team of literacy and math education coaches for help understanding select Indiana Academic Standards in grades 2-5, including how student knowledge is expected to grow vertically across grade levels. Each standard below includes a brief overview video introducing the standard as well as grade-specific videos demonstrating what can be taught to effectively address each goal.

English/Language Arts Standards

Reading Foundations: Fluency

RF.5, the fluency standard, is stated the same way from Grade 1 to Grade 5. It’s important for teachers to do two things:

(1) Teach all children the range of skills and strategies of fluent reading, no matter their reading levels

(2) Match fluency instruction and support with the sophistication and complexity of the texts children encounter as they grow.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Reading Literature: Key Ideas

RL 2.3, Key Ideas and Textual Support in reading literature, helps students build comprehension and appreciation of literature by identifying, describing and making inferences about literary elements and themes. With increasing complexity across grade levels, students will describe how characters, settings, events, and details impact plot.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Reading Literature: Structure and Organization

There are two key parts to this standard, which is meant to support readers in understanding and enjoying what they read. Point of view refers to who is telling or narrating a story. First-person and third-person are two common points of view. Point of view is not the same as perspective, which refers to a character's world view. For example, a story could be written in first-person point-of-view, but the story itself could reveal multiple perspectives related to the various characters in the story.

Structure refers to the parts of a piece of literature and how those parts are organized. This standard explores common structures found in stories, poems, and plays. Knowing about these structures and considering an author’s intention in using them, supports deeper understanding of the texts students read and makes it more likely that students will fall in love with reading.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Reading Nonfiction: Features and Structures

Text features include title, author, table of contents, captions, index, illustrations, maps, tables, graphs, subheadings, and more. In this standard we're looking at a child's ability to use what they know about what a text feature is and how it works. Across the grades, knowledge of text features is layered to give students the understandings they need to use the features to comprehend the text itself. With increasing complexity, students can name text features, explain what the text features do, use those features to gain information from the text or solve a problem independently.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Reading Nonfiction: Connection of Ideas

The Indiana standards emphasize the importance of nonfiction reading skills with the expected learning outcome that all students develop reading proficiency on a continuum of growing skill and independence. As readers develop, they are expected to navigate increasingly complex text, apply several comprehension strategies in tandem, and read independently for longer periods. While reading nonfiction texts, readers should be able to understand and connect information and use nonfiction text structures and features to locate and comprehend information. Critical literacy demands that young readers develop the ability to identify and evaluate information for accuracy, credibility, and bias, as well as compare and evaluate information from multiple sources, including online and print text. Proficient nonfiction readers understand the relationships between facts and supporting information, and recognize the differences between facts and opinions in a text. In Grades K-2, readers are expected to notice how an author provides information about a topic and why it’s important to do so. In Grades 3-5, readers must also distinguish between facts and opinions in a text and identify an author’s specific claims and supporting information.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Mathematics Standards

Adding and Subtracting Fluently

Computation and Algebraic Thinking (Grade 2) and Computation (Grades 3-5) featuring Ryan Flessner

Often, fluency in arithmetic is understood to mean that students can use the standard American algorithms to achieve correct answers quickly. Unfortunately, simply mastering the steps of the standard American algorithms does not ensure that students have a deep understanding of the concepts of multi-digit addition and subtraction. The standards in this strand allow students to build conceptual understandings in a variety of ways prior to learning and mastering the standard American algorithms. While the expectation for learning this algorithm remains, the standards in this progression allow students to understand why the algorithms work by first constructing concrete understandings, moving to strategies that connect to understandings of place value and the properties of operations, and then to mastering the standard American algorithms.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the grade-level videos for detailed support.

Multiplying and Dividing Fluently

Number Sense (Grade 2) and Computation (Grades 3-5) featuring Courtney Flessner

There are often misconceptions that fluency means one must memorize basic facts and traditional algorithms in order to do math quickly. Such is not the case. Students are fluent when they can efficiently solve a problem using strategies they understand. Further, students are fluent when they build off their number sense and explain how they computed. As students achieve correct answers, they must do so while explaining their methods. The standards in this strand allow students to transition from skip counting to learning and mastering basic multiplication and division facts. After that, they expand their fact knowledge into fluently multiplying and dividing within 100 before they master the traditional American algorithm for multiplication in fifth grade. The expectation is that students will understand why the traditional algorithm works by building off the work they do in Grades 2-4. It is important to note that fluency with the traditional American algorithm for long division is a sixth grade standard and, therefore, it is not included in this particular strand.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Real-World Addition and Subtraction Problems

Computation and Algebraic Thinking (Grade 2) and Algebraic Thinking (Grades 3-5) featuring Ryan Flessner

The Indiana Academic Standards place a high priority on contextualizing the mathematics students study. This series of videos examines how educators can assist students in seeing addition and subtraction in the world around them. Rather than reviewing specific strategies or tools students use in solving these problems, these videos address ways educators can construct problems for students to solve. In addition, a variety of contexts for Grades 2-5 is discussed so the problems students complete are real-world but also realistic and relevant to their lives.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Real-World Multiplication and Division Problems

Computation and Algebraic Thinking (Grade 2) and Algebraic Thinking (Grades 3-5) featuring Ryan Flessner

Educators in all grade levels must provide students with real-world problems to solve. Rather than discussing strategies students might use to multiply and divide in Grades 2-5, we use this series of videos to

(1) describe different ways teachers can construct problems while ensuring students deeply understand multiplication and division concepts and

(2) examine real-world contexts in which students apply their knowledge of multiplication and division.

As we discuss the construction of contextualized problems, we also explore ways to make these problems real-world, realistic, and relevant to the lives of students. The second-grade standard in this series does not pertain to real-world problems. However, it is an excellent precursor to preparing students to engage in this work in Grades 3-5.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the individual grade level videos for detailed support.

Making Sense of Fractions

Geometry (Grade 2) and Number Sense (Grades 3-5) featuring Courtney Flessner

In Indiana, state standards have placed high priority on fraction concepts across the elementary grade levels. Whole number concepts such as the relationships between tens and ones, rounding numbers, utilizing estimation skills, and decomposing large numbers are frequent topics covered in classrooms. Yet, number sense doesn’t stop with whole numbers. Fractions, decimals, and percents are numbers, too! It may seem odd to pair a geometry standard in second grade with number sense standards in Grades 3-5; however, the second-grade standard of partitioning shapes is a precursor for work with fractions in Grades 3-5. In those grades, students build on this knowledge to conceptualize fractions as part of a whole or part of a set, understand the concept of equivalence, and extend this knowledge into mixed numbers.

Learn more in the overview video and downloadable PDF. Then watch the grade level videos for detailed support.

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